Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Innovation Wins: 'Klaus' is Now in Production


Rejoice, fellow people who appreciate motion pictures that don't try so damn hard to look just like real life!

Sergio Pablos' exciting-looking traditional animation/CG hybrid film Klaus is in production! This has been confirmed via their facebook page.


Last I heard, Pablos was collaborating with the newly set-up Cinesite Animation to make the picture a reality. To me, this project is basically taking Paperman's techniques and actually doing something feature-length with them. I'm not sure if Walt Disney Animation Studios is planning on making their proverbial "Paperman movie," but until the day they really deviate from their current house style or whatever (that doesn't include shorts), we've got films like this to look forward to.


Now it may be happening, but the release is a whole different story. Of course, we all want this to be a wide release, but nothing's guaranteed, so I'm not going to hold my breathe. As long as it reaches big screens in some way, that would be nice... But it deserves a no-holds-barred wide release.

What say you?

10 comments:

  1. This is indeed great news. However, there's one problem. Since I heard it will be released in 2019, well Disney just announced that Frozen 2 will come in Thanksgiving 2019. And Frozen is a big money maker and it'll be a challenge for Klaus.

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    1. As long as it's released far away from competition like that, and given an actual marketing campaign, it should be fine. But we have to wait and see if someone big picks it up for distribution.

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    2. I agree, and who knows? Maybe things will probably work out, and the movie will somehow succeed.

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    3. I do hope so. Because I want to see Disney do hand drawn animated features again, even if it has to be different than usual.

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    4. KLAUS alone will not be enough to make the public take notice of handdrawn animation again. Other films will have to be successful. Films such as DRAGON'S LAIR and DAWGTOWN. They have to make a difference.

      That said, while you can choose to hope for handdrawn animation to make a comeback, I suggest you don't waste your life hoping for it to happen in the near future, period. Do so and you will just be disappointed.

      I'm not saying that it won't make a comeback, not by any means. It could, it could not, but obsessing over it is unhealthy, especially when it boils down to insulting others for being pessimistic about the situation. You can't help that; people are despondent about the future of animation in America for a reason. To hope for things to change is fine. Obsessing over it and getting into hissy fits, on the other hand, is not.

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    5. I don't recall getting into hissy fits with others about it (though I know of folks who do), but I do understand what you're saying. Me? I try to be cautiously optimistic about this, sometimes I'm down about it, sometimes I just say "One of these days..."

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    6. In all fairness, I wasn't targeting that message at you, just the poster above.

      Yes, I AM hopeful for this movie to make a difference; it's just hard to be that way when I see others being pessimistic that the writing is on the wall and nothing can bring handdrawn back into the mainstream. Deep down, however, I do believe a comeback will be inevitable over time (records went out of demand for a time, but gradually they made a comeback in recent years -- if vinyls can, so can handdrawn).

      On the flipside, too, I saw some recent color animation on Bluth's DRAGON'S LAIR movie pitch. It looks promising, although I wonder how he's going to get the funding for it. Hopefully he does, though. That's a movie I'd love to see come to fruition.

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    7. I'm on the same page. Despite what some say, and despite what the "realistic" viewpoint is, hand-drawn animation just can't be exiled from American theatrical animation forever. Something, some day, has got to change. That's been my stance for the time being, and I see movies like 'Klaus' as possible baby steps to making executives realize that audiences actually didn't give up on this art form. I'm also keeping an eye on what role Netflix might play in all of this.

      As for Don Bluth's 'Dragon Lair' movie, I have no idea where that has been at. I'm assuming he didn't meet his crowdfunding goals? Things have been rather hush-hush. I'd love to see Bluth at least make that happen, regardless of how it ends up performing.

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    9. First of all, I wasn't attacking anybody about Disney not doing hand drawn animation and I'm doing the best I can not to obsess about that, I'm working on that.

      Second of all, I'm not trying to be pessimistic at all. I'm just saying that if Klaus landed in theaters in 2019, (although I would be surprise if it pushes back to 2020.)
      it might have some tough competition between that movie and Frozen 2. But who knows, it might try to be away the competition.

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